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Journal Vol. 30, No. 3 — The Politics of Infant Feeding

ISSN 2516-5852 (Online)

To read or download this journal as a PDF, please click here

Editorial: The Politics of Infant Feeding
By Journal Editor Emma Ashworth

The Better Breastfeeding Campaign – Fighting for breastfeeding support
Ayala Ochert inspires local campaigners to protect and save essential breastfeeding support services

Breastfeeding with insufficient glandular tissue
Philippa Lomas’ experience of breastfeeding with mammary hypoplasia

Banking on change at Hearts
Gillian Weaver explains why the Hearts Milk Bank is different to other UK donor breastmilk banks, and how it will help women and babies

Baby Milk Action - The State of the States
How the USA is leading the way in allowing commercial companies to undermine breastfeeding, and how it is impacting us in the UK

Beyond the infant formula business there is resistance
Marta Busquets explores the origins of the Nestlé boycott

York – It’s not for women
Emma Ashworth outlines the concerns she has with York’s homebirth guidelines

Lessons Learned Review: The Nursing and Midwifery Council’s handling of concerns about midwives’ fitness to practise at the Furness General Hospital
AIMS’ response to the Professional Standards Agency’s (PSA) report on the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)

Conference Report: MUNet
Notes from the meeting on Tuesday 10th July City University London

Dr Ágnes Geréb Update (August 2018)
Donal Kerry updates us on Midwife and Obstetrician Dr Ágnes Geréb’s partial clemency

Introducing: The Association of Breastfeeding Mothers

Book Review: The Positive Breastfeeding Book: Everything you need to feed your baby with confidence
Reviewed for AIMS by Sarah Kidson

Book Review: Ina May's Guide to Breastfeeding
Reviewed for AIMS by Jo Dagustun

Book Review: How to have a baby: mother-gathered guidance on birth and new babies
Reviewed for AIMS by Maddie McMahon

Claire’s birth story: The arrival of Iris
Claire Pottage shares the story of her first birth, baby Iris, born at home

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