Supporting those who witness bad practice

ISSN 0256-5004 (Print)

AIMS Journal, 2014, Vol 26 No 4

Beverley Beech makes some suggestions

It is not uncommon for those who are supporting a woman during childbirth to witness bad practice and then wonder what can be done about it. Here are someprinciples:

Advise the woman to obtain her own copy of her case notes (it is not uncommon for the notes to be at odds with what was obser ved).

Talk to those who also witnessed the incident and determine whether or not they would support your view of what occurred.

When you have a quiet moment, sit down and write an account of what you obser ved, who was present and what action was taken at the time.

Discuss what happened with the couple, if possible, and determine what they want to do about it. If the woman has been traumatised then it may be many weeks before you are able to raise the issue.

Support them with what they have decided they would like to do about it. If they do not feel able to make a complaint they may be willing for you to make a complaint on their behalf.

Obtain a copy of ‘Making a complaint about maternity care’ from AIMS.

Contact AIMS and discuss the options.

Then what to do? There are a number of options:

Discuss what happened with the staff concerned.

Arrange a meeting with the Head of Midwifery (HoM) to discuss your concerns.

Alternatively, particularly if you feel that the HoM will not take action, write to the Chief Executive with a copy to the HoM. This ensures that senior management are aware of the issue and there is a record of a previous concern should a similar event occur again.

If you observed malpractice or negligence, you have the option of reporting the member of staff to their professional body:

  • midwives, nurses and health visitors – Nursing and Midwifer y Council
  • doctors – General Medical Council
  • social workers – Health Care Professions Council

Beverley Lawrence Beech

Latest Content

Journal

« »

Editorial: Mission Better Births. B…

AIMS Journal, 2018, Vol 30, No1 By Jo Dagustun, Editor I’m going to start with an assumption: that everyone reading this Journal is already convinced that we can do far b…

Read more

The Consequences of Discontinuing C…

AIMS Journal, 2018, Vol 30, No1 A birth story by Emma Ashworth It was my booking-in appointment for my second baby, and I didn’t want to be there. I didn’t want to birth…

Read more

Campaign update: Is the NMC fit for…

AIMS Journal, 2018, Vol 30, No1 By the AIMS Campaign Team Change at the NMC: why is this important to AIMS? AIMS recognises that a large number of taxpayer funded nationa…

Read more

Events

« »

Improving Patient Safety & Care

http://ipc2019.govconnect.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&alias=our-mission-early-years-profiles-2018&view=article&id=73&Itemid=181

Read more

4th Annual Birth Trauma Event

Details on Eventbrite Organised by Dr Rebecca Moore who has recently founded to the Make Birth Better Network

Read more

MBRRACE-UK ‘Saving Lives, Improving…

To register your interest please email conference@npeu.ox.ac.uk or keep an eye on our website https://www.npeu.ox.ac.uk/mbrrace-uk/bookings . Earlybird bookings will open…

Read more

Latest Campaigns

« »

Ágnes Geréb is granted clemency by…

28 th June 2018 "This act of clemency is about more than me. It is an acknowledgement of liberty in giving birth. It is a recognition by the state that the rights of wome…

Read more

Press Release: Jeremy Hunt announce…

AIMS is delighted that the Government has recognised the importance to the safety of women and babies of the continuity of carer model of midwifery. Having a midwife that…

Read more

Dr. Ágnes Geréb, Hungarian Midwife…

Dr. Ágnes Geréb is a Hungarian obstetrician and midwife who has been fighting for her freedom following her house arrest and thret of imprisonment due to her support for…

Read more